Tips For Storing Firewood – Using a Firewood Rack

DIY Outdoor Firewood Storage Rack

Firewood Rack Offers One Solution

Making sure that you have enough firewood to last you through the winter means planning far in advance. Freshly cut and split logs are never recommended for burning because of their significant moisture content; only seasoned firewood, which has an ideal moisture content of 15% to 20%, will provide you with an efficient fire that produces low emissions. According to the Wood Heat Organization, properly seasoned firewood has been “cut, split, and stacked. . .in the early spring and [left to] stand in the sun and wind all summer.” Wood that is stacked in a single row, rather than stacked in back to back rows or thrown into a pile, allows for more air to circulate and more moisture to evaporate. Prepared in this way, firewood can be ready for burning in six months, but it never hurts to save the wood you cut and split this year for next year’s winter fires.

Storing your seasoned firewood properly is an important consideration, and there are any number of options available. Here are a few tips to keep in mind when deciding how and where to store your seasoned firewood.

Convenience and Insect Deterrence

Seasoned firewood that you plan to use for the upcoming winter should be easy to access, but storing logs against an outside wall of your home is not recommended. Firewood can attract insects, and if logs are stored next to the house, pests can enter your home or cause damage to your home’s exterior. Some of the best, most convenient places to keep seasoned firewood are next to a fence or next to the shed or other outdoor storage building. If you suspect that your firewood may be crawling with critters, do not give into the temptation to spray the firewood with pesticides because burning these logs will create harmful toxic vapors.

Protection From Moisture

So that your firewood burns efficiently, it should stay dry while outdoors. If there is enough room available inside your outdoor shed or storage building, then firewood can be stored easily there. Alternatively, a simple tarp can be used to cover your firewood to prevent it from taking in moisture from rain or snow. Tarps are inexpensive and can be tied down easily to prevent them from blowing away. If your stack of firewood is stored in a place on your property that is not visible to passersby, then choosing to cover the stack with a tarp will not negatively affect your home’s “curb appeal.”

Elevation and Air Circulation

If stored directly on the ground, firewood can soak up moisture and attract insects. Storing your firewood in a sturdy Firewood Rack will keep your logs elevated, promote air circulation, and deter pests and wood rot. A Firewood Rack can be hand made from wood, but a rugged tubular steel-framed Firewood Rack is rot-proof and rust-proof, easy to assemble, and comes in multiple sizes, so you should be able to find one that fits the space in which you plan to store your firewood.

Properly storing your seasoned firewood will ensure that you have easy access to it when it’s needed without also sending an invitation to pests to invade your home. Proper storage will also keep your firewood dry while at the same time encouraging air circulation. By following these simple tips, you will be sure to enjoy long-burning, low emission fires throughout the winter season.

About Trey Collier

Avid Do-It-Yourself-er. Love's being outdoors. Helped push the shade sail market into one of the fastest growing outdoor shade structures product in North America.

One thought on “Tips For Storing Firewood – Using a Firewood Rack”

  1. elissays

    just make sure your rack is anchored to whatever it backs up against … my lovely “easy” tubular metal rack blew right over with a shift of some logs after the first bout of bad weather…what a drag to find a full load of seasoned wood laying perpendicular to your efforts… especially if the discovery is made AFTER it becomes a big Popsicle buried 6″ in the snow… I don’t know if it would have pulled the fence down-so I may have been better off …. just be aware that these things shift and fall, the heavier they are.

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